Why Adidas is moving into utility marketing with All Day fitness app

Whether you’re into yoga or weight training – there’s bound to be an app suited to your athletic pursuit of choice. The market has been flooded over the past few years, with more than half of all smartphone users reported to have downloaded a fitness app of some kind. 

Like most sports brands, Adidas has been present in the app market for a while, capitalising on the opportunity to target consumers and build brand loyalty.

Its MiCoach app (now Runtastic) aims to help improve users’ fitness performance, while its Adidas Confirmed app lets users know about exclusive product releases.

Now, Adidas is taking a broader approach, combining different types of health and fitness tracking technology into a single app. ‘All Day’ – just launched in the US – is an all-encompassing version designed to help users ‘begin their journey to well-being’.

But, is there a market for yet another sports-brand app? More to the point, how will Adidas benefit?

Technology to manage health, not just fitness

From the Nike+ Training Club app to MyFitnessPal and Fitbit, there are a tonne of similar apps on the market. Interestingly, Adidas’s All Day app does not appear to be a carbon copy of other brand examples, instead, focusing much more on health and well-being for women.

While it is inspired by sport, the app is tailored around four distinct categories of movement, nutrition, mindset, and rest. This means if the user is not that interested in one category, such as exercise, they’ll still be able to gain value from others like food and sleep.

Essentially, it’s an interesting example of utility marketing, with Adidas ensuring that it is there to meet the individuals needs at any time – without directly promoting its core products.

Moving into the health industry could prove to be a shrewd move from Adidas. According to research, two-thirds of Americans favour digital health management over physical. Meanwhile, healthcare apps have seen a surge in interest, with a 16% increase in downloads during the past two years.

Adidas is not the only brand to veer into this market. Under Armour’s Record app is also geared around general health verticals such as fitness, nutrition, and sleep – capitalising on its ability to track and help users throughout the entire day, not just during moments of exercise.

Using content to inspire

One way the Adidas All Day app differentiates itself from the competition is by going beyond performance tracking, also using content to inspire users.

This part of the app is called ‘Discoveries’, with the current selection including recipes and healthy eating tips from food author, Candice Kumai, and a custom music playlist from DJ Nina Las Vegas.

As well as capitalising on the authority of influencers, Adidas is focusing on high-quality content to tap into the general lifestyle interests of women.

The aim here is to provide more than just utility. So while some people might use fitness apps for a while and then forget about them, or only think of using them in the moment of exercise, Adidas wants to provide the inspiration for maintaining and enjoying a healthy lifestyle.

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